It is difficult enough for one person to be organized and maintain that state of organization on a daily basis. Now imagine being thrust into a living situation with a person you have never met before, who is not a relative or even a friend. A person with different sleeping, grooming, eating, and studying habits, who may be from a different background or culture, and who has a different schedule and interests to boot. Enter the college roommate. When described in the abstract, the college roommate situation reads like a recipe for disaster. Yet, thousands of college students manage to live successfully and harmoniously every year with a roommate who, just days before the beginning of the semester, they had no contact with. Often times, this exercise in living is a wonderful entrance into the “real world” for college students and can serve as an example of the importance of compromise and flexibility that will serve the student in years to come.

Two such young women decided to work with a professional organizer and life coach, hoping to not only improve their living situation, but their overall lives and habits as well. Let their experience serve as an inspiration to all roommates, college or otherwise, who find themselves living in close quarters with a person they’ve never shared a space with before.

Meet Marta and Maria: So Alike and Yet So Different

Marta Anderson-Winchell and Maria Boere found out they were each other’s roommates about one week prior to heading to college. They had never met before.  In many respects, Marta and Maria have a lot in common. Both entered Pace University in September 2003 as freshman and reside on the Briarcliff, New York campus, in the suburbs of New York City. Both attend Pace on a soccer scholarship, are interested in pursuing a career in human services, maintain good grades, and consider themselves family oriented. Yet, there are many differences between the two young women. Marta not only plays soccer for Pace, but also basketball, which forces her to engage in some serious time management. Marta’s family lives within an hour’s drive from campus, which means being able to head home every two weeks to do laundry. Maria isn’t so lucky, as her family resides in Nashville, Tennessee. Maria shared a room back home with her older sister, while Marta never had to share her space before. Although in the same year of college, they are almost an entire year apart. Most importantly, however, is the fact that the two have very different habits when it comes to organizing and maintaining their space and lives.

When I first visited Marta and Maria, I was struck by how small their dorm room is, but isn’t that par for the course in college? What separates organizing a college dorm room from a traditional house bedroom is that the college dorm room must function as a lot more than just a place to sleep. If you split the dorm room into zones, you realize how multi-functional the space must be. There is the sleeping zone (bed and dresser), the dressing zone (armoire style closets), the food zone (mini-refrigerator and dry food storage), the studying zone (desk and bookshelf), and the hanging out zone (television and chair). That is an awful lot of stuff to cram into one space, but then you also need to double almost everything in order to accommodate two people. It’s no wonder college students are often disorganized – there’s too much stuff in one little space!

Maria is a self-professed procrastinator. She likes things clean but let’s the chores go until she cannot stand it anymore (sound familiar, all you procrastinators out there?). In fact, she will let her laundry pile up until she runs out of undies (if she runs out of clothing such as sweatshirts, however, she often steals Marta’s!). She admits that this stresses her out and she’d like to “change her ways.” Marta does more of the general straightening of the room on a daily basis, while Maria actually does more of the cleaning, such as sweeping and mopping the floors. Neither really likes to or has time to cook, so they usually eat in the cafeteria, but they do keep some food staples in their room (although not near the fridge, but we’ll get to that later).

Doing Better Than They Think But There Is Room For Improvement…

So how are they doing? Not bad. Not bad at all. For two people who have never lived together before, Marta and Maria have managed to figure out a way to make it work. Instead of working against each other’s weaknesses, they compensate for each other. Heck, some married couples could learn from these two! But before we give them a freshman-student-living-together-harmoniously-award, let’s focus on what can be improved.

The actual room set up and design is working. However, Marta and Maria have a huge bean bag chair in the middle of their room. When asked if either ever really sit on it, the answer is once in awhile. Do guests sit on it? Sometimes. How often do they have guests? Not that often. Thus, we discussed storing the chair under Maria’s bed where there was adequate space. That would give a sense of openness to the small room. When guests drop by, they can just take beanie out from under the bed. Interestingly, once we discussed moving the bean bag chair from its precious center room location, the two confided during a later visit that they have been using it more often! Sometimes, when faced with the prospect of purging or relocating an item, a person realizes its value and begins to appreciate it and use it. At least now, however, when it is not being used, it has a “home” to go to that is a bit more out of the way.

Another design flaw of the room organization is that the dry food and cooking supplies are stored on the sole shelving unit across the room from the small fridge. I recommended moving the food and cooking supplies to an open area next to the fridge, which is now unused space. It is a narrow space but there is a lot of room vertically. Often times, vertical space is sorely underutilized and can provide the answer to a storage problem.  So we used a narrow, but tall, clear plastic drawer unit with 5 smaller drawers on top, and 2 deep drawers on the bottom. All of the food easily fit in, as well as the few cooking supplies. Now, they have an actual “food zone.” An additional advantage to this reorganization is that it freed up the shelves where the food used to be for storing things like videos, CDs, photo albums, and their toiletry carts (the bathrooms are down the hall, which means carrying toiletries back and forth). We stored those items in pretty open wicker baskets of varying sizes with removable cotton muslin lining for ease of cleaning. The design provides easy access as the baskets are open, and add charm to the space. We used a matching, but smaller, wicker basket to store extra videos that they watch more frequently on top of the television.

The clothes inside their small armoire closets are pretty well organized. However, their shoes are actually on top of their armoires. They claim they can easily see and reach the shoes up there, and they do not want them in the bottom of the closets so the shoes can air out properly after use (remember we are talking athletes here…). One thing organizers know to do is to work “with” the client, so we left the shoes up there as the system works for them.

As for Maria and her laundry, I recommended setting aside one night per week after soccer practice as “laundry night”. Using positive association, I offered up Thursday night as she can put in her laundry before Friends begins, watch the half hour episode, and then switch the clothes to the dryer. She can then take an hour or so to check and reply to e-mail, and then fold the clothes while listening to she and Marta’s favorite radio show, the Delilah show (which they bonded over when they first moved in together and realized they were both huge fans) while winding down before bed. Using positive association will help Maria not dread laundry, but instead think of it in association with fun television shows, e-mailing friends and family, and winding down with music and perhaps a chat with Marta. Having her laundry done every week will also avoid the pile up that stresses her out and causes her to run out of clothing. She gave this a try and said it did help somewhat. I reminded her that it takes time to make new habits, so she plans to keep at it. I have no doubt she will improve her laundry situation as she is motivated to change this behavior, despite her tendencies towards procrastination.

What Does the Future Hold?

Marta and Maria plan to continue living together as roommates in their sophomore year. They already heard that they are moving to a different dorm. Their actual room will be smaller (yikes!), but it will be part of a suite with another room for two other students, and a common living room and bathroom for all four to share. I have no doubt that they will make the smaller space work, and I plan to check in on them to see whether they have been able to maintain the organized systems we put in place. And when I do, I imagine they will whip out the bean bag chair from under the bed for me to sit on. After all, I may be their professional organizer, but I am also their guest.

This article originally appeared in Balance magazine in 2003.
Copyright © 2003 Lisa Montanaro of LM Organizing Solutions, LLC.

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Copyright 2003. Lisa Montanaro is a Productivity Consultant, Success Coach, Business Strategist, Speaker and Author who helps people live successful and passionate lives, and operate productive and profitable businesses. Lisa publishes the monthly “DECIDE® to be Organized” e-zine for success-minded individuals, and “Next Level Business Success” e-zine for entrepreneurs. Subscribe today at www.LMOrganizingSolutions.com. Lisa is the author of The Ultimate Life Organizer: An Interactive Guide to a Simpler, Less Stressful & More Organized Life, published by Peter Pauper Press. Lisa also publishes the DECIDE® to be Organized blog at www.DecideToBeOrganized.com. Through her work, Lisa helps people deal with the issues that block personal and professional change and growth. To explore how Lisa can help take your business to the next level, contact Lisa at (845) 988-0183 or by e-mail at Lisa@LMOrganizingSolutions.com.

By Guest Blogger, Tim Eyre

After years of struggling to find the time to get organized, I finally decided to make it part of my normal routine.  Along with regular meetings and appointments penciled in on my calendar, I now schedule organizational sessions to help keep my household in order.  The following is a description of my basic strategy, which can easily be customized for any lifestyle.

First Day of Each Month.  The first day of each month is an ideal time to conduct a survey of perishable items in your kitchen.  I know way too many people who procrastinate in disposing of expired foods.  First, tackle the refrigerator.  Go shelf by shelf, looking at expiration dates on packaged foods and dispose of anything that’s already out of date.  Also, inspect other food items and get rid of anything that’s moldy or smelly.  Even if rotting food appears to be safely stored in containers, you don’t want those things sitting next to the food that you and your family plan to eat.

Next, focus your attention on the kitchen pantry, using the same basic strategy.  Pre-packaged foods should be discarded if the expiration date has passed (or, if you don’t anticipate using an item anytime soon, purge it if the expiration date is approaching).

After disposing of food items in the refrigerator and pantry, it’s time to carefully clean those spaces.  Wipe down shelves and organize the food in a logical manner so it’s easy to locate in order to minimize waste.

Anniversary of Move-in Date.  I always recommend that people identify a particular day or week during the year to concentrate on some heavy duty cleaning and organization.  “Spring cleaning” seems to be the approach many families take, but I think using the anniversary of the day you moved in your home is a great substitute.  First, it’s a date that most people can easily remember and it will also get you on a regular schedule that you can follow for years to come.

Around the anniversary of your move-in date, closets are a good place to start.  A common rule of thumb is to remove clothing from your closet if you haven’t worn it in the last year.  Special garments may merit exceptions to that rule, but the goal is to eliminate clutter caused by clothing doesn’t get worn.  After working through your own closet, move on to the closets in the kids’ rooms.  A thorough sweep through children’s closets is particularly important, as they tend to grow out of clothing rapidly.  Items that no longer fit should be removed and stored away if they can be passed down to younger siblings or gathered together for donation to a charitable organization.  And don’t forget the coat closets.  Outerwear often gets overlooked, leading to jam-packed conditions in coat closets.

Five Year Anniversary of Move-in Date.  Every fifth year on the anniversary of your move-in date, it’s time to address areas of the house that don’t warrant as much attention as the kitchen and closets.  For example, comb through the tools and other items stored in the garage and remove things that don’t work or that don’t get used anymore.  Although “organization” isn’t a term commonly associated with attics or basements, if you can’t easily locate the items stored in those areas, you’re not doing yourself any favors.  Therefore, going through those spaces about every five years and donating items that you don’t anticipate using again will help reduce clutter and keep things organized.

Major Holidays.  Following major holidays, assessing your stock of festive décor is important.  I’ve seen families lease separate storage units just to hold Christmas decorations.  Unless you have a sprawling estate that can handle that amount of holiday cheer, chances are it’s time to conduct a major organizational overhaul of these seasonal decorations.  As with closets, a common rule of thumb is to purge ornaments or decorations that haven’t been used in one or two years.

Ten Year Wedding Anniversary.  From household appliances to fancy dinnerware, the amount of “stuff” many couples amass through wedding and shower gifts is mind-blowing.  However, some couples find that those items they thought would be treasured keepsakes actually have little utility.  And others realize that the elegant dinner party they envisioned probably will never happen, making cabinets full of silver and crystal useless.  While there’s nothing wrong with holding on to sentimental items like these, I know some couples who decided to sell such items to make some extra cash and make more room for useful household storage.

Graduation.  Once children reach a certain age, it’s time to start parting with those stuffed animals we couldn’t let go of years ago and those boxes full of juvenile artistic artwork.  There’s no rule that you have to purge all your children’s memories, but you should expect for them to take some role in storing and organizing their own things.  Upon graduation from high school or college, or whenever your children start moving away from home, you can send some of these things with them.

In his role in the self storage industry, Tim Eyre helps customers care for their cherished belongings that must be put in storage. Tim regularly visits facilities including a self storage facility in Peoria. He was also recently meeting customers and staff at the Chicago self storage center.

The last in a series of spring-related re-posts of articles to help you make the transition into warmer weather. Enjoy!

I have found that among its other benefits, giving
liberates the soul of the giver.”
~ Maya Angelou

This time of year, many people are switching their clothes to prepare for the new season.  Most people do not have enough room in their everyday closet for two seasons’ worth of clothes.  So the big switch begins!  Out with the summer clothes here in the Northeast and in with the fall/winter ones.

Transition times are perfect for donating.  As you put away and take out each article of clothing, think about whether it fits, is a great style for you, needs tailoring, etc.  If you decide to donate, there are many worthy charities and organizations ready and able to take those clothes off of your hands and get them into the hands of those who need them.  Here are some choices:

Help the children of KenyaThe Help Kenya Project

This is a Westchester County, NY based charity that focuses on helping the children of Kenya. They collect donations of used computers, books, clothing, sports equipment, and other supplies and ship them to Kenyan schools and libraries. In return, they ask that the recipients plant trees to combat deforestation and provide children with a place to rest and play out of the sun.

It’s incredible how valuable the book or computer you might be throwing out is to a Kenyan child. By providing Kenya’s students with science, English, and computer skills, they give them a much better chance of finding good jobs later in life. It breaks the cycle of poverty by helping Kenyans to help themselves. This is a charity that truly leaves a lasting impact.

Vietnam Veterans of America
VVA accepts donations of household goods and clothing in 30 states in the continental United States. To make a donation, please refer to the state map. Identify your area and call the phone number referenced.

see the difference your donated goods can make in the worldTangible Karma is a donation tracking service that gives you a chance to see the difference your donated goods can make in the world.  At Tangible Karma their mission is to inspire and motivate you, to transform items that are hindering your life into valuable gifts that could make a meaningful difference in the life of another.

In addition to the above organizations, don’t forget Dress for Success, Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army, American Red Cross, St. Vincent DePaul Society, Big Brothers-Big Sisters, domestic violence and homeless shelters, places of worship, educational institutions, animal shelters, hospitals, nursing homes, and libraries.  I am sure you can think of even more in your area!

Adopt an organization and make it a point to get a wish list from them so that you can fill it with the items you no longer love, use often, or need.  Then sit back and experience the satisfaction of knowing that your cast-offs are becoming someone else’s needed treasures.

Spring is the perfect time to switch your cold weather clothes for your warm weather ones. Here is some guidance on how to do this big overhaul for those closets!

The Clothes Closet Overhaul

  • Remove everything from your closet.
  • Create four piles: Keep, Donate, Toss, Tailor/Clean.  If you haven’t worn it in a few seasons, get rid of it!
  • Try on everything in your keep pile and decide item by item if it is really a keeper.  If you are unsure, try it on and look in a mirror.  Or better yet, ask a kind but honest friend to come over and give you his/her opinion as you conduct a mini fashion show.  The ultimate – get a pro and hire an image or wardrobe consultant to help you.
  • If you have a few sentimental favorites you can’t part with but won’t wear, store them in your Memory Box or out of season storage area.
  • Once you’ve pared down, give your closet an orderly flow.  Organize by garment type (shirts, pants, dresses, suits), season (current in most accessible location), color (only if that appeals to you), use (work versus casual), size (good for babies and little kids who grow out of sizes easily) — whatever makes the most sense for your lifestyle.
  • Consider storing your off-season clothing in separate location if it takes up too much room.  Dress clothes/evening wear used occasionally can also go elsewhere.
  • Use wooden hangers for suits and slacks, clear plastic swivel hangers for shirts, and padded hangers for lingerie and delicate items.
  • Be ruthless about weeding out your clothes on a regular basis, at least whenever there is a change of seasons.  Place a donate bin, box, or bag at the bottom of your closet as a constant reminder! Donate any items not used in the last few seasons, that don’t fit (yes, even your “fat” or “skinny” clothes — it is bad energy to have clothes that don’t fit you hanging around!), or that are out of style.  Remember to keep track of what you donate and get a receipt for a tax deduction if you donate to a tax-exempt charity!

In honor of spring, I am re-posting one of my favorite articles/posts. Enjoy!

Spring marks the transition from winter into summer. It is a time that most of us equate with renewal, increasing day length, and a symbolic changing of the seasons. Spring is seen as a time of growth, when new life (both plant and animal) are born. The term is also used more generally as a metaphor for the start of better times. For many, it is also a time for cleaning and organizing – i.e., the Spring Fling!

During the winter, we tend to stockpile. It is in our nature. Chances are you’ve got some clutter left over at work, at home, in your car, on your computer, and in your head. This is an ideal time to do some eliminating. The old adage, “Out with the old, in with the new” definitely applies this season. To help you with your Spring Fling, the following are some tips for clearing the clutter.

  • Purge Your Paper Inbox – When is the last time you’ve seen the bottom of your paper inbox at work and at home? Make it a goal this spring. Develop a paper management system to try to keep it that way.
  • Overflowing inbox

  • Eliminate Email Clutter – Schedule some time to clear your email inbox. Delete unnecessary emails, capture contact information, delegate tasks that can be done by someone else, send those “replies” finally, and set up filters and folders to avoid back-log in the future. Once you get your email inbox down to one page (where you can see all emails without having to scroll down), try to maintain it.
  • Go on a Calendar Diet – Take a look at your busy calendar and try to clear 2-3 social or work obligations that you said “yes” to that you now realize you should not have. We all do it (yes, even the professional organizer/time management expert!). Time is limited and precious, so think carefully about what you want to fill it with.
  • Switch Clothes – If you have not already done so, this is the perfect time to switch your clothes from the cold weather items to the warm weather ones. Make 4 categories:
    1. Clean your closetPurge (damaged clothes)
    2. Donate (clothes that do not fit, you do not like, or that are out of style, but can be worn by those in need)
    3. Keep (clothes that fit, that you love and wear often)
    4. Dry Cleaning/Tailoring (clothes that need to be professionally dry cleaned or mended).
  • Retire the Christmas Decorations – You think I am kidding on this one. I am not. You know who you are. If the Christmas decorations are still up outside or inside your home, it is high time you put them away. Go do it, now. Your neighbors will thank you.
  • Take Care of Your Taxes – Yes, the official tax-filing deadline for personal income taxes is April 15th (or April 18th this year!). However, many people take an extension, which means they will be filing this summer. Stop procrastinating! Gather the documents to get those taxes done. And for those of you that already filed, purge old tax records that no longer need to be saved (check with your accountant, but generally, the average person needs to maintain 7 years of tax records in case of an audit claiming fraud). Don’t forget to shred!
  • Clean your carDeclutter the Car – You will be passing many car washes held by various charities this time of year. You’d like to get your car cleaned, but you don’t want anyone to see the inside! Sound familiar? Clear that car clutter. Empty out the garbage that has accumulated, bring in items that you purchased that are sitting in bags in the trunk, and return all sorts of “stuff” to its place in the home or office that found its way into your car. Ah, now go get that car wash or, better yet, treat yourself to a full car detailing.
  • Organize Outlying Areas – Clear clutter in the garage and shed so that you can find the things you need this spring and summer. Take out the patio furniture and grill, dust off the bikes, and put away the snow blower. If you can’t reach the lawnmower, chances are you will not use it as much. You may have put the Christmas decorations away, but with that jungle you call a yard, your neighbors will still not like you very much.
  • Mend the Medicine Cabinet – Clear out any winter medications that you stockpiled, such as cough medicine and cough drops that have expired. Ditto for prescription medications that have expired. Buy yourself some new sunscreen, as that also has a limited shelf life.
  • Makeup Makeover – Makeup attracts bacteria. Therefore, purge any makeup that is “old.” While there is no exact life span for makeup, if you haven’t used it in a year, it is time to go. For more exacting makeup safety guidelines, visit http://tinyurl.com/punhg9.
  • Overhaul Your Toothbrush – You should replace your toothbrush every 3 months. Period. Get a new one. It feels great!

There you have it — the Spring Fling checklist. Take your time, and work through it. I guarantee you will feel a sense of renewal, while clearing the way for a productive and pleasant summer season.

The Clothes Closet Overhaul

  • Remove everything from your closet.
  • Create four piles: Keep, Donate, Toss, Tailor/Clean.  If you haven’t worn it in a few seasons, get rid of it!
  • Try on everything in your keep pile and decide item by item if it is really a keeper.  If you are unsure, try it on and look in a mirror.  Or better yet, ask a kind but honest friend to come over and give you his/her opinion as you conduct a mini fashion show.  The ultimate – get a pro and hire an image or wardrobe consultant to help you.
  • If you have a few sentimental favorites you can’t part with but won’t wear, store them in your Memory Box or out of season storage area.
  • Once you’ve pared down, give your closet an orderly flow.  Organize by garment type (shirts, pants, dresses, suits), season (current in most accessible location), color (only if that appeals to you), use (work versus casual), size (good for babies and little kids who grow out of sizes easily) — whatever makes the most sense for your lifestyle.
  • Consider storing your off-season clothing in separate location if it takes up too much room.  Dress clothes/evening wear used occasionally can also go elsewhere.
  • Use wooden hangers for suits and slacks, clear plastic swivel hangers for shirts, and padded hangers for lingerie and delicate items.
  • Be ruthless about weeding out your clothes on a regular basis, at least whenever there is a change of seasons.  Place a donate bin, box, or bag at the bottom of your closet as a constant reminder! Donate any items not used in the last few seasons, that don’t fit (yes, even your “fat” or “skinny” clothes — it is bad energy to have clothes that don’t fit you hanging around!), or that are out of style.  Remember to keep track of what you donate and get a receipt for a tax deduction if you donate to a tax-exempt charity!

The entryway. Depending on your home, it can be an entire mud room with lots of space, a formal foyer at the front of your house, a breezeway from the garage, or a portion of a hall in a small apartment.  Regardless of where it is, or its size, if it is organized, your homecoming will always be less stressful, not to mention that you may actually want to have visitors over!

The following are some tips to help make your entryway more organized:

  • If you have a front or back hall closet, use it for everyday outer wear for the current season only.  Add a shelf, a shoe rack and any other organizing products that help contain clutter.  If there is room, you can even add a hanging shelf system (a canvas one will work fine) for accessories to be handy, such as hats, umbrellas, scarves, and the like.
  • If you are not lucky enough to have a closet in your entryway, then you need to create the storage system by using cubbies, pegs, a bench, a shoe drying mat, umbrella stand, hanging mail and key slot, etc.  Make this your launching and landing pad for outerwear, knapsacks, briefcases, keys, etc.
  • Accessories go in containers (baskets, bins, or any other type of container): gloves, hats, scarves.  Organize by family member or by accessory category, whichever makes the most sense for your home and family.
  • This may be a good place for a “return and repair center” if you have space.  It is where you keep items that need to be returned to the store, the library, or to rightful owners that you borrowed them from.  Likewise, you can store items to be repaired here so that you are reminded to grab them as you head out the door.
  • You may opt for a hall table if you have room for a mail, key, wallet, and cell phone area.
  • Put all keys in a small container and label the keys, either with a permanent marker or key tabs, so that you know what each key corresponds to.  As a security measure, you may want to use a code instead of labeling the keys “back door,” garage,” etc.

Try to implement some of these tips so that the entryway is less cluttered and says, “Welcome” when you come home!

I have found that among its other benefits, giving liberates the soul of the giver.” ~ Maya Angelou

This time of year, many people are switching their clothes to prepare for the new season.  Most people do not have enough room in their everyday closet for two seasons’ worth of clothes.  So the big switch begins!  Out with the summer clothes here in the Northeast and in with the fall/winter ones.

Transition times are perfect for donating.  As you put away and take out each article of clothing, think about whether it fits, is a great style for you, needs tailoring, etc.  If you decide to donate, there are many worthy charities and organizations ready and able to take those clothes off of your hands and get them into the hands of those who need them.  Here are some choices:

The Help Kenya Project Help_Kenya_Project

This is a Westchester County, NY based charity that focuses on helping the children of Kenya. They collect donations of used computers, books, clothing, sports equipment, and other supplies and ship them to Kenyan schools and libraries. In return, they ask that the recipients plant trees to combat deforestation and provide children with a place to rest and play out of the sun.

It’s incredible how valuable these donations are to a Kenyan child.  This is a charity that truly leaves a lasting impact.


Vietnam Veterans of America Vietnam_Veterans
VVA accepts donations of household goods and clothing in 30 states in the continental United States. To make a donation, please refer to the state map. Identify your area and call the phone number referenced.


Tangible_KarmaTangible Karma is a donation tracking service that gives you a chance to see the difference your donated goods can make in the world.  At Tangible Karma, their mission is to inspire and motivate you, to transform items that are hindering your life into valuable gifts that could make a meaningful difference in the life of another.

In addition to the above organizations, don’t forget Dress for Success, Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army, American Red Cross, St. Vincent DePaul Society, Big Brothers-Big Sisters, domestic violence and homeless shelters, places of worship, educational institutions, animal shelters, hospitals, nursing homes, and libraries.  I am sure you can think of even more in your area!

______________________________________________________________

Adopt an organization and make it a point to get a wish list from them so that you can fill it with the items you no longer love, use often, or need.  Then sit back and experience the satisfaction of knowing that your cast-offs are becoming someone else’s needed treasures.