So, you are searching for a new job?  Perhaps you are making a voluntary career transition.  Maybe you have been laid off, or worse, fired.  Regardless of the reason for your job search, one fact remains true: if you are conducting a job search, it is vital that you take an organized approach.  Managing your job search is just like managing any other major project.  You must create an infrastructure that allows you to operate in an efficient and productive manner.  A successful job search requires forethought and action.  Here are some tips for conducting an organized job search.

1. Declutter and Pre-Purge – If you are embarking on a job search, it will be difficult to do so if your physical space is covered in clutter with piles of papers everywhere.  Take some time to declutter.  Purge any unnecessary items, file papers that you need to keep, recycle junk mail, and get some order back into that space!  It will be easier for you to concentrate on your job search without all of that chaos and clutter around you.  Just be careful that you don’t spend too much time decluttering that you start using it as an excuse to procrastinate with regard to your job search.  A few days should suffice.  

2. Create a Job Search Schedule– Let’s face it – searching for a job is hard work!  If you are still employed while you are conducting your new job search, be prepared to have an extremely busy schedule.  If you are currently unemployed, realize that you do, indeed, have a job – conducting a job search!  Create a job search schedule that gives you ample time for all of the activities you need to focus on in order to succeed: resume and cover letter preparation, surfing the web for jobs, networking, interviewing, follow-up, etc.  Block out time in your calendar for job search activities and treat that time as you would any traditional work commitment.  Be consistent in the amount of time you spend each day and week on job search activities so that you keep your momentum going, and don’t lose focus and miss valuable opportunities.

3. Get Your Gear in Order– Update your resume, cover letter, references, and writing sample (if applicable).  Ask for letters of recommendation and testimonials from previous or current supervisors, co-workers, and professional colleagues.  Get some nice new stationery, and stock up on print cartridges for your printer.  If you want to use an outside source for printing, some local printing shops will copy resumes for free during an economic downturn, so ask around!  Be sure to have a computer with high-speed Internet access.  An all-in-one machine for printing, copying, faxing and scanning will also come in handy during a job search.

4. Create Job Search Central– Set aside space at home (or wherever you will be conducting your job search activities) and make it job search central.  Keep all of your job-search related supplies in that location, which will make it easy for you to find them when you need them.  This will also help you to get into job search mode when you are in that space.

5. Create a Job Search Paper Management System– You may be acquiring a lot of paper in your job search: resources, articles, sample resumes and cover letters, business cards of networking contacts, contact-us-later or rejection letters, etc.  To the extent that you can maintain these items in a paperless fashion, go for it.  But if you have to maintain hard copy paper, be sure to create a job search paper management or filing system, to be stored in your job search center.  Keep it simple and use whatever system makes the most sense to you for ease of use (binder, portable filing bin, traditional filing cabinet, etc).

6. Plan Job Search Activities– Plan out job search activities on a daily basis, such as phone calls to make, resumes to send, online applications to fill out, informational interviews to conduct, etc.  Write down your job search activities as calendar items, to-do’s, or tasks so that you take them seriously and treat them as measurable goals.  Be realistic with regard to what you can reasonably accomplish in one day, but also challenge yourself!

7. Track Job Search Activities – Organizing your job search involves keeping track of all information and communications.  Keep a record of where you sent your resume and when, whom you have spoken to, when interviews took place, etc.  This information will prove vital when deciding when to follow-up with leads.  You can track all of this information using a calendar such as Outlook or Google, or an online tool such as JobFiler.com.  Whatever tools you use, it is important that you be able to track the status of your job search.

8. Manage Job Search Email – In today’s world, much of your job search will likely be conducted by email.  Therefore, before you even start your search, whittle down the amount of email in your inbox so that you can hyper-focus on your job search emails, which will add up quickly.  Create folders within your email system using categories that make sense to you, such as Companies Applied To, Contacts Submitted Resumes To, etc.

9. Polish Your Online Profiles – If you are conducting a job search in today’s market, you would be remiss not to develop an online presence on social media sites, especially LinkedIn, which is the most “professional” of the social media sites and can essentially serve as your online resume.  But also consider other social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter.  The opportunities are endless for employers and contacts to find you online.  You may even have your own website, e-zine, or blog.  Maybe you post articles on various article-marketing sites, or serve as a guest blogger on other blogs.  If you maintain profiles on any of social media sites, or have any type of online presence, be sure to polish your profiles so that they promote the image you want potential employers and contacts to see.

10.  Change Your Greetings – Change the message that greets callers for any phone number that you plan to use for your job search so that it sounds professional, and conveys the information you want callers to hear.  Be prepared, not embarrassed!

11.  Stay Positive – The longer a job search takes, the more chance you have of becoming negative about it.  Try to maintain a positive attitude to the extent you can by monitoring your progress and staying active in your search.  When the going gets rough during a job search, many people take a back seat and give up, which is counter-productive.  Try to stay focused and make valuable contacts that are likely to lead to a job.  However, don’t be all consumed by your search for a job!  Maintaining some balance in your life at this time will serve you well.  Get adequate sleep, eat well, see family and friends for pleasure, and make time for exercise.

Organization is one of the single most important things you can do to keep your job search manageable.  Just like being organized helps you improve any other area of your life, home, or work, it will also help move along your job search in quick and efficient fashion and with less stress.  It may even wind up being the key to finding that dream job you always wanted.

“When people go to work they shouldn’t have to leave their hearts at home.” ~ Betty Bender

Do you feel like you have to check your heart at the door before you walk into your office everyday? Are you disillusioned with your current job situation and would like to make a change? Maybe you’ve had it with “Corporate America” and want to jump ship?

Unfortunately, there are a lot of people out of work right now. Does this mean that you should give up all hope of changing jobs? No! This may be the perfect time to start planning your exit strategy, or to actually make it. The need for work that sustains you and satisfies you has not changed simply because the economy has changed. It may make your search more challenging, or you may have to delay your decision to look for greener pastures until employment prospects increase in your employment sector, but you should not abandon your hopes and dreams of finding more meaningful work. What you must do, however, is some serious preparation so that you are ready to take action when the time is right.

The following is some guidance to help you plan your eventual exit.

quit_jobTiming is Everything – How do you know when you are ready to jump ship? The answer depends on many factors. Unless you are absolutely miserable and need to get out of your current job situation immediately in order to preserve your health and well-being, I recommend you slowly plan your exit strategy while still working full time. There are many benefits to this approach, including financial (save money, pay off debt, etc.), and emotional/psychological (prepare yourself and your family for a major change). Consider going part time first if your employer is open to it. This may allow for a smooth transition on both sides.

Determine Your Motives – If you don’t know why you want to leave your present job, this is where you need to start. Why do you want to leave your current employer/ profession? Are you running away from your present position, or running towards something new? For example, before I became an entrepreneur, I practiced law for 9 years. Although I had a profound respect for the law, I did not appreciate the way it was practiced in our society.  It became too negative in the hands of those that wanted to use it to fight.  I started to become restless and knew that there were other ways I could share my talents and expertise with people and organizations to improve the world.  I did a lot of soul searching and arrived at the conclusion that I needed to leave the traditional practice of law and become an entrepreneur in order to truly make a difference. So my motives were a combination of wanting to leave my past profession and wanting to embark on a new one.

Examine Your Choices – Do you want to leave your present job to “go it alone?” In other words, would you like to become self-employed, start your own business, or work as a consultant or freelancer? If so, you will need to start researching entrepreneurship to make sure it is a good fit for you. What about moving to a different size employer? For example, if you currently work for a large corporation, consider a mid-sized business or small office where you may be able to take on more responsibility, and enjoy better life-work balance. Love the idea of helping others? Maybe the non-profit world would be a good fit for you. Start brainstorming job and career ideas, and then conduct empirical research to see if those ideas are realistic for you.

Don’t Burn Your Bridges – If you have an open relationship with your current employer and don’t think you’d risk losing your job, you could share your news and offer to help your employer find and train your replacement. Your current employer may become a great ally in your job search and career transition. If you strike out on your own, who knows? Your current employer could become your best new client!

Use Your Transferable Skills – If you are unsure what your next move is, start looking at your transferable skills. Many people get caught up in the title or position of their job. This is the time to think outside the box! Think of the types of work that you have thought about or admired in the past. Imagine the work environments you think you’d thrive in. Focus on tasks and activities you like to do and excel at.

re-trainingBuild New Skills – Try to gain the skills necessary to make the career transition while you are still working in your present job. Are there professional development workshops you can attend? Maybe you can take an online course? Can you conduct informational interviews with experts in the field you want to enter? Identify what skills you are lacking, and try to get experience and education in those areas before you start your job search in earnest.

Make Connections – Network with professionals in the field you want to enter. Call upon your sphere of influence to assist you in making crucial connections that will help you get a job in a new setting or industry that you have had your eye on. This is the time to build a professional network of people that are eager and willing to help you make this transition.

Get Support – Connect with others who have faced their own turning points and have survived and flourished. Talk to your friends and family so that they understand your desire and need for this change. Hire a professional coach or career counselor to become your guide on this journey.

If you ask most people what they want out of their career, they will say satisfaction. And yes, career satisfaction is a good thing. But let’s take it a step further. The people that seem to be the happiest in their careers are the ones that not only get satisfaction out of their work, but are able to bring their passions into their work also. Passion in your career? Yes!

I firmly believe that the road to success is actually paved with passion. There is magic in passion. If you believe in your work (for whatever reason, it’s important to you), you will take more risks, bounce back more easily from set backs and rejections, and work longer and harder on your projects.

So how do you tap into the passion in your career? Here are some tips.

  • Remind yourself of why you went into this line of work in the first place. Perhaps you turned a beloved hobby into a career, but now have become mired down in the day-to-day details and have lost sight of the meaning behind your work. Try to take a step back from the daily grind and tap into the passion that drove you to choose this line of work. Assuming your work was a choice (and that you were initially happy with that choice), spend some time thinking about WHY you chose the work and the excitement you experienced in knowing that you get to do this work for a living.
  • love_your_workSee your work from the eyes of a very happy, satisfied, evangelical client or customer. Think about your favorite client or customer. The one that pays on time, treats you and the work you do with respect, and makes working with him or her fun. Now see the work that you do from his or her perspective. Looks a lot more interesting from that angle, doesn’t it?
  • See your work from the eyes of a grateful client or customer whose life was somehow changed in dramatic ways based on the work that you do. Again, this is all about finding the passion in your work. What better way to do that than to view your work from the eyes of someone whose life was affected in measurable and important ways by the services you performed or products that you or your company provides.
  • Focus on projects that excite you and allow you to use your unique talents and skills. All too often, we get caught up in the humdrum work that is not particularly interesting, and that doesn’t excite us. Try to seek out projects that allow you to use your talents and skills, and that downright excite you. I realize that not all work projects fall into this category, but to the extent you can, make sure you always have at least one really juicy project to focus on that can help to eclipse all of the other, less desirable ones.
  • Stretch yourself and try something new. Tired of doing the same old type of work over and over again? Then seek new pastures at work. Let it be known that you’d like to try some new ways of doing things, or new types of projects. Try to do a similar task or project a different way, or choose different colleagues to work with you from time to time. Mix it up to keep things from getting stale.
  • Go for the gold and seek a promotion, a new client or account. If you realize that you are actually holding yourself back, start to think about how you can “go for it” in your work. Can you apply for that amazing opening in another division that you have been eyeing? How about a promotion in your own department? When was the last time you tried to obtain a great new client or head up an initiative or project? Be your own best advocate and the passion will flow a lot more than usual!

Think back to when you were just a wee little boy or girl. Do you remember the question people used to ask all of the time? “What do you want to be when you grow up?” I was thinking about that question today and realized that on so many levels, it is totally unfair!

child-grown_upFirst, how in the world do we expect such a young little one to have any idea what he or she may do for a living when they grow up? Heck, most people I know, regardless of age, still have things they want to do and try in their lifetime. Lots of unfinished business, dreams, hopes, and goals floating around regardless of age.

Second, at what point are we “grown up?” Is it at 18 years old when we graduate from high school and can vote, but can’t yet be trusted to legally drink alcoholic beverages? If a young man or woman is undecided on his or her major in college, most people think he or she is misguided, not focused, and indecisive. Yet again, how many adults (a/k/a “grown ups”) do you know that are using the exact major they studied in their present job/career?

Third, let’s break down the actual question: What do you want to BE when you grow up? A wise guy or girl can answer that he or she wants to be happy, healthy, wise, in love, gainfully employed, successful or any other adjective of his or her choosing. Or maybe you realize that you will be many things at the same time. One title may not define you. You may be many things like a daughter or son, spouse, friend, employee, entrepreneur, etc.

So what if here you are, a grown up, and you still aren’t sure what you want to be? Not only do I think that’s okay, I think it’s way more common than most people realize. And now it is socially acceptable too. We don’t have to make our first career our last. We do n’t have to define ourselves by one title. Change is often inevitable, regardless of how old we are and what we have done in the past. We all go through periods in our life when we ask “What’s next?” Maybe you’ve been in the same career for years and are ready for a change. Maybe you want to take a giant leap and go into business for yourself. Maybe you want to take a sort of “sabbatical” and re-think things. These periods of uncertainty when we go back to that childhood question can be scary — but hopefully also exciting!

Research shows that for many generations, people were expected to find a job/career and stick with it their whole working life. The workplace and retirement systems were set up that way and job stability was the great motivator to stay the course. This generation is made up of job-hoppers who will stay on average only 3-4 years in any one position. This generation, known as the Millennials, consider themselves “free agents” and will subject themselves to the possibility of financial insecurity in order to find happiness and fulfillment in their work lives. They feel that it is a small price to pay for freedom.

career_changeI have an insider’s and outsider’s perspective on this issue. I completed my own successful (and risky!) career transition from a lawyer to a coach/consultant/speaker/author 12 years ago on the heels of the 9-11 terrorist attacks (and thank my lucky starts every day that I get to do this for a living now!). The tragic events of that day served a catalyst for me to do a lot of soul searching on what the next path was for me and make the leap from my career as a lawyer. Of course, it was scary. The change looked like a big mountain looming before me. It’s amazing how scary those mountains look before you climb them. And now that I’m sitting on the other side of the mountain, I can look back and see how beautiful the mountain really is and how great the other side looks.

I have also had the privilege of coaching many clients through career transitions over the years. I think people go through “chapters” in their life, and their careers change — if they have the courage to follow through. It’s not always easy to turn the page when one chapter has ended and it is time to move on. But what I have seen as an outsider and experienced as an insider is true magic. Corny but true. Pretty much everyone I know, including myself, that has made a career change has come out on the other side better for it. Happier, more fulfilled, and grateful that they made the leap and took the chance regardless of outcome. Let’s face it… it’s usually the things we don’t do that bring us the biggest regret.

So if you still don’t know what you want to be when you grow up, don’t fret. It ain’t over just yet. I hope you have the courage to scale your mountain!

There’s a concept that keeps coming up lately when I’m doing coaching and consulting with my clients. It’s the concept of experiencing the valley of your “new normal.” It could be a huge change that you’re making to your business, like adding on a new income stream, or closing down a division that no longer gets you jazzed. Or maybe it’s changing careers or getting a promotion that you’ve been dying for, but are scared to death of now that you’ve been handed it. Maybe you’re relocating, starting a new relationship, getting organized, or working on a health and fitness plan.

Continue Reading…

the_artists_wayIn the amazing book The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron, she discusses the concept that all of us have an “art” that runs deep within us yearning to break out. This art can literally be an artistic talent like painting, writing, or performing, but it could also be something else entirely. It can be connecting, teaching, being funny, etc. For some people, they find this art at a very young age, and they build a career and a life around it. For others, they may find this art, but decide not to do anything with it, or fight it tooth and nail. Some abandon it, never to let it come to the surface again. The people that bury their art often wind up being extremely unhappy in their careers and their lives. The ones that pursue it wholeheartedly are usually profoundly happy and feel they are living out their calling.

But is there an in between? I believe so. There are some people that do not pursue their art directly, but indirectly it becomes a part of their life or career. Cameron calls this being a shadow artist. For example, the class clown who decides not to pursue a career using humor directly as a stand-up comedian, but becomes a professional speaker whose humor is a big part of how he connects so deeply with his audiences. The painter or sculptor that decides that she doesn’t want to be a struggling artist trying to get her work into art galleries, but instead decides to become an art teacher and share her passion and talent with the next generation of artists. Or a dancer who decides to become a choreographer helping other dancers create art on stage. But beware — being a shadow artist can be a negative experience, as in the case of someone that is deeply resentful of not pursuing his or her art directly. The key is to make sure that your art indirectly manifests itself in your life or your career in a positive manner so that it still remains a part of your life, while not being resentful that you’re not pursuing it directly.

attorneyMany people struggle with having spent so much time training and preparing for their art, that they dig their heels in stubbornly refusing to abandon it, or incorporate it into their life in another way. I was once in this position. I convinced myself that I was an attorney at heart. I badly wanted to believe it, as I had invested so much time, money and energy training to become a lawyer. Much about that world was alluring. It was intellectual, paid extremely well, was high powered, and was well respected, while giving me the sense that I was helping others in a meaningful way. It was enticing the way a drug would be. Plus, I was really good at it. It took me almost a decade to understand that the law was not the right fit for me — or maybe not to understand it, but to accept it and move on. I realized that law was not my true art. Instead, my true art was to help, guide, teach, motivate and inspire others. Unfortunately, the way that my art manifested through my being an attorney was a huge disconnect. It was too negative, too stressful, and not as directly helpful as I had hoped it would be and wanted it to be. I had the right intentions but chose the wrong package to house them in. Once I realized this, I had to make a change. And I did. I now get to enjoy being a coach, consultant, speaker, and author using my true art in a way that feels positive, and is a perfect fit for me.

Having spent so much time navigating my own successful career transition and guiding others through theirs, I have found that there are 3 key steps to identifying your own art.

1) What did you want to be when you grew up? Not the specific answer… but the underlying impulse. What is the archetype that is deep within you? What is your true art? I wanted to be a stage actress, singer, and dancer. When I dug deep, it was more about the art and craft of performing, and connecting with the audience than being famous, so it was easy to make that a hobby, and incorporate some aspects of it into my work as a professional speaker. I wanted to teach the deaf as I was so inspired by Helen Keller and my deaf family members. I did teach and interpret for three years and it was a wonderful experience. The teacher archetype runs strong in me to this day and all of my work incorporates it.

snowboarder2) Pay attention to the work you gravitate to in your “day job,” as well as your volunteer activities. Often, it’s not the position, title, company, or anything official that shows us our true art, but the actual work. What work puts you in “flow” state? What gets you jazzed, taps into your passions, or is just plain fun or interesting to you?

3) Pay attention to what you envy. Jealousy may be an ugly emotion, but it often uncovers our true desires or tells the truth in some form. It may not be the exact thing you envy, but some version of it. When I first decided not to pursue Broadway as a career, it was often difficult for me at that time to go see a show. I realized I still had some envy around that choice and had to really examine whether I had made the right decisions with abandoning that dream. Over the years, it became clear that I could keep a foot in the theater world through performing in community and regional theater, and I would not be resentful, envious or jealous of those that had pursued this art directly and made it on Broadway. With this sense of peace and acceptance around my decision, I am able to fully enjoy theater as a participant, and as an audience member.

It’s obvious that people flourish when they’re engaged in occupations, roles or settings that are aligned with their personalities. But I think it goes deeper. Your true art doesn’t have to come out in the work you do at all. However, I believe it has to come out somehow. So if the work you do doesn’t allow you to integrate your art at all, make sure that you’re able to express your art in your personal life. Your art should strongly arouse your passions and provide a welcome place to express yourself. It should be like an emotional vacation. Think about what your art is, and then be sure that you integrate it into your life somehow. Because the last thing you want is to wake up one day and realize that you have been burying your art your entire life. That would be not only be a shame for you, but the world.

Interested in delving further on this issue, or other aspects of your life, career or business? I offer one-on-one private coaching/consulting, group coaching programs, corporate consulting and executive coaching, and speaking programs. Contact me so we can explore the possibility of working together!

tuscany-viewWhat’s YOUR version of The Sweet Life? The La Dolce Vita lifestyle is about following your dream, deciding not to play small anymore, living your life to the fullest, and allowing the real you to shine through!

Join me for the La Dolce Vita 6-Week Group Life Coaching Program, starting Thursday, February 20, 2014. We will enjoy 6 weeks of open-line calls (recorded for your convenience), powerful content and exercises, a private Facebook group, and much more! All designed to help you make significant changes in your life so that you can adopt a La Dolce Vita kind of lifestyle no matter where you live.

Maybe for you “The Sweet Life” means:
Saying no to a toxic relationship that doesn’t serve you.

  • Cultivating a hobby or passion that you have always wanted to try.
  • Adding a little romance (or a lot!) into your life.
  • Taking better care of your body or spirit.
  • Going to bed at night feeling peaceful and waking up looking forward to the day.
  • Changing careers.
  • Enjoying quality time with your family and friends.
  • Writing a book (its been on your bucket list for years).
  • Running a marathon or some other type of active pursuit.
  • Traveling – finally giving in to that wanderlust!
  • Saying ‘No’ more often.
  • Saying ‘Yes’ more fully.

Whatever that larger vision for your life is… that’s what La Dolce Vita is all about.

Many of you have expressed interest in coaching with me, but can’t afford the one-on-one price. This is an ideal way to get the coaching you crave at a rate that meets you where you are. This program is powerful, yet affordable. Early bird rate is only $299 if you register by February 13th. $359 thereafter. There’s even a handy 2-pay option if you need to spread payments out.

NOTE: For those of you that need or want continuing education units (CEUs), you may be able to use some of the topics for CEUs depending on the guidelines of your certification and whether you will use the content for yourself, your business, and/or your clients. If you are a coach or organizer, for example, many of the topics may qualify for CEUs. So keep that in mind!

If you want results and are ready to live The Sweet Life, then join us!

Ciao!

I am noticing a pattern or theme that keeps coming up for many of my clients lately. They express their strong desire for change (whether it be to grow their business or improve or change something in their life or career), but that they don’t “have the time” to devote to the change process. They are basically treating change like a one night stand! They will get excited about it, maybe take it out for a drink and even take it home for the night, but then in the morning, poof! They lose interest, turn their attention elsewhere, and lose change’s number. That is not the start of a lasting commitment. And change definitely takes commitment.

change_ahead_signIndeed, transformation takes attention. And yes, that means of your time. If you want to change, transition, transform, or grow in any area of your life or work, you must make that a priority and block off time for the change to happen. I know it isn’t easy and takes discipline, but it will always be worth it in the long run. Here are a few tips on how to treat change with some respect and make the magic last a lot longer than one night.

Clear the Decks
When we start a change process, it is important to examine how much time, attention, energy and effort it will take. Some changes are a lot more complex and demanding than others. Is this a good time to start this change process? Have you cleared your calendar to make room for it? Be realistic about how much “deck clearing” you need to do to make this change truly happen. Set yourself up for success by planning for the time and attention to devote to the change process.

Surround Yourself with “Believing Eyes”
supportive_colleaguesThe author, Martha Beck, uses the term “believing eyes” in her fabulous book, Finding Your Own North Star (one of the best career transition books out there in my opinion!) as a way to describe the positive and supportive people you should surround yourself with when undergoing a change or transition. This is so important and is part of your pre-change work. Choose your tribe or team carefully! Don’t surround yourself with Debbie Downers and Negative Nellies (or Neds!) who will sabotage your efforts, try to derail you from your path, or express resentment, anger or jealousy. Kick that type of toxicity to the curb! And if it is someone that you have no choice but to cross paths with (say someone you live or work with for example), then set ground rules up front, such as that your change process is off limits for discussion. Period. If they can’t play nice, then don’t invite them to play at all!

Honor Appointments With Yourself
We give a lot of weight to appointments that we set with other people, or events, meetings and occasions that we attend. We block them out on our calendar and then we make a commitment to show up unless there is a true emergency. And yet, most of us do not honor appointments with ourself in the same manner. In order to be fully invested in the change process, you must block out the time on your calendar and then honor that appointment as if you made it with the most important person in your life. Why? Because you are an important person in your life! And you are worth it. Don’t skimp on time for your own personal and professional growth and development.

Anticipate and Plan for Setbacks
Ah… the best laid plans. We make them and then life happens. Try your best to anticipate what type of obstacles may arise as you embark on this change process and plan for them in advance. Have an upcoming deadline at work that may get in the way? Prepare for that deadline as much as possible in advance, get help mee ting it, or better yet, delegate some of the tasks. An upcoming vacation may take you off course? See if you can continue your change process while on vacation, even in small ways so that you don’t get totally off track. Whatever road blocks may show up on the obstacle course, try to outsmart them.

Be Patient
Did I mention that change takes time? Be patient with yourself and the process. Don’t expect change to happen overnight. Spend some time with it. Take it out on a few dates, bring it home to meet the family, wine and dine it. Be willing to put in the time, effort and energy to make the change a lasting one.

Celebrate
celebrateIf you have stayed the course and given the change process the time, attention and commitment that it deserves, then you will be able to reach the finish line. When you get there, be sure to look back and reflect on your journey.

Try to learn from the success of this change process so you can use it to avoid “change one night stand” syndrome in the future. Give yourself a round of applause and celebrate in an appropriate manner to mark the significance of achieving your change. Congratulations!

Life After Law is Out!

lifeafterlawI am honored to be profiled in this amazing new book by author Liz Brown, “Life After Law: Finding Work Your Love With the JD You Have.” It is an awesome career guide for lawyers and non-lawyers alike. Liz profiles lawyers that have jumped ship from a traditional law career to find greener pastures elsewhere. The real life stories are inspiring, and can be used as a motivator if you are thinking of making a career transition or reinventing yourself.

My transition from a practicing lawyer to an entrepreneur (coach, consultant, speaker and author) is profiled in the book, along with my honest advice on that journey. Grab your copy today!

Listen to Lisa’s interview with Career Coach Caroline this Tuesday, January 31st at 5pm EST on CBS Radio – part of the Coach Me Radio Series.

Lisa will be discussing her career change from attorney to Productivity Consultant, Success Coach, Speaker and Author, as well as her best advice for others considering a career transition. Listen in as Lisa will also share her top 3 take-aways for getting organized this New Year… and more..

Broadcast LIVE on CBS, New Sky Radio, Career Coach Caroline can be heard on KJAQ HD3 Seattle, WBMX HD3 Boston, WOMC HD3 Detroit, WDSY and WZPT HD3 Pittsburgh. The show also streams on NewSkyRadio.com http://sky.radio.com/shows/coach-me/, the CBS Radio AOL stream, and on Yahoo radio, Blackberry, iPhone and iTunes.